Sci-fi opera

I’m always a bit surprised that there aren’t more sci-fi themed operas.  It seems like a natural fit for the medium.  I’ve seen a couple.  A few years ago the UoT composer collective opera was an EM Forster based piece called The Machine Stops.  There’s also Aaron Gervais’ The Harvester which I’ve seen twice in workshop and which may one day see the light.  Now another has come to my attention but, alas, it’s in London, England so I wont be able to go.  It sounds interesting though.  It’s by Alastair White, it’s called Wear and it’s about fashion and the apocalypse.

The publicity material describes it as “A sci-fi fashion opera at the wild, impossible edges of contemporary art music: Waiting for Godot meets Lulu for the post-truth generation.”

Mark Berry (whose opinion I generally find reliable and insightful) reviewing an earlier incarnation said “spellbinding…an opera of rare imagination – and success”.

It’s getting it’s first fully staged outing next month directed by Gemma Williams.  It will run for two nights at the Bridewell Theatre on the 23rd and 24th of August with special post-show events, as part of the festival ‘Opera in the City.’

If anyone can go and would like to review I’ll happily guest blog it.

WEAR LEAD IMAGE OPERA IN THE CITY

Another Giasone

Cavalli’s Il Giasone is a bit of a rarity but perhaps, like the rest of his opus, it’s getting more attention than it used to.  The latest video recording of it was made at the Grand Theâte Genève in 2017.  There’s a summary of the rather convoluted plot in my review of an earlier version from Vlaamse Opera.  Oddly in this version Isifile’s final aria omits the weird section about her cold dead breasts.

1.prologue

Continue reading

Creepy Wozzeck

Alban Berg’s Wozzeck seems to attract just about every possible treatment from directors other than a straightforwardly literal one.  Krzysof Warlikowski’s approach, seen at Dutch National Opera in 2017, is to go back to the original story on which the Büchner play, in its turn the source for the opera, is based.  Wrapped around that are several interesting ideas which I can’t fully unpack but which make for a rather creepy but compelling production.  Alas, the disk package has nothing to say about the production so, interpretively, one is on one’s own.

1.dancers

Continue reading

Whose Opera is it Anyway? November edition

Last night’s Whose Opera is it Anyway? from LooseTEA Theatre featured Alana Viau MCing, Natasha Fransblow on keyboards, Rachel Krehm, Michael York, Gillian Grossman and Amanda Kogan improvving and a thirteen year old kid called Alex (or possibly Alice) stealing the show.  The format was the usual.  Games where the audience supplies some key element e.g. a place – a launderette and designated cast members turn it into a sketch.  Best of the night I think was the “breakfast food” sketch with Michael and Amanda which went from a surprisingly filthy “left over pizza” to “left over pizza backwards” to “left over pizza in the Dark Ages”, mostly in Pig Latin.  There was also a very creepy “execution” sketch where Rachel gleefully cut body parts off a recumbent Michael.  Do not upset this chick!

There was lots more and of course it’s very silly.  That’s the point!  But it’s good fun and worth a look.  The next edition is at Bad Dog Theatre at 8pm on December 20th.

whoseopera-nov

Artsong ReGENERATION 2

Yesterday we got the second recital by the song fellows of the Toronto Summer Music Festival.  In the week since the first concert they have been working with mentor Soile Isokoski and it showed in the programming.  There was quite a bit of Strauss and more Finnish and Swedish music than I have ever heard in such a recital.  Among other things this highlighted just how difficult Strauss songs are to sing well.  They are exceedingly tricky yet have to sound absolutely effortless.  Three of the four sopranos on show tried.  None of them succeeded completely(*).  So it goes.  And so to the details.

Continue reading

Artsong ReGENERATION 1

Toronto Summer Music Festival has two “apprenticeship” programmes; one for chamber musicians and one for singers and collaborative pianists.  The latter is directed by Martin Katz and Steven Philcox.  On Saturday afternoon in Walter Hall we got our first chance to see this year’s young artists.  Eight singers and four pianists were on show.  The singers were a mix of those who are well known to anyone who follows student opera in Toronto and newcomers.  The pianists were all new to me.

Art Song reGENERATION July 15

Continue reading

Rusalka à la Freud

Stefan Herheim’s 2012 production of Dvořák’s Rusalka for Brussels’ La Monnaie Theatre is predictably ambitious and complex.  He takes an explicitly Freudian (by way of Lacan) view of the piece(*).  The female characters are representations of male views of the female and, sometimes it seems, vice versa.  It’s seen most clearly in Act 2 and I found unpacking Act 1 much easier after seeing it so I’m going to start there.  We open not with bucolic, if coarse, peasants preparing for a wedding feast.  We are on a street in a scruffy part of, I guess, Brussels.  The gamekeeper and kitchen boy are replaced by a priest and a policeman.  The traditional dismembered game animals become a female chorus, many of them nuns, with exaggerated secondary sexual characteristics.  There is, essentially, an orgy.  Clearly the human world that Rusalka cannot enter is about sex in its most physical aspects not meaty Central European banquet platters!  Rusalka and the Foreign Princess are dressed and wigged identically.  They are quite freely interchanged.  Lines that are canonically addressed to one are addressed to the other and so forth.  It’s pretty clear that each represents, albeit imperfectly, the Prince’s ideal woman.  Rusalka is the unattainable feminine ideal; flawed in that she cannot engage in fully satisfying sexual activity.  The foreign Princess is sexually satisfying but falls short precisely by not being unattainable.  Some less clear male duality is suggested by the appearance of the Vodnik dressed as the Prince.  It just gets weirder from there with the ballet of nuns, prostitutes, fish, squid and heaven knows what else spilling over into the auditorium while the Prince and Foreign Princess watch from a box and Rusalka and the Vodnik get caught up in the action.  At the conclusion of the act it’s Rusalka not the Princess that he begs for help.

rusalka1

Continue reading