Electric Messiah IV

Soundstreams’ Electric Messiah is back for a fourth outing, again under the musical direction of Adam Scime.  The formula is basically the same as previous years.

  • Take excerpts from Handel’s Messiah
  • Add some new music
  • Arrange for small chamber ensemble, electronics and turntables (Sarah Svendsen, analog and electric harpsichord; Joel Schwartz, electric guitar; Jeff McLeod, electric organl; SlowPitchSound, turntablist)
  • Take a quartet of singers from different vocal traditions (Jonathan MacArthur, Katherine Hill, Aviva Chernick and Alex Samaras)
  • Throw in a dancer (Lybido)
  • Have some of the text sung in a language relevant to the singer (Gaelic, Hebrew, Swedish this time)
  • Stage it at Drake Underground

This year in addition there was some interpolated music not directly derived from Messiah; to whit, a gospel piece for Samaras called “Personal Jesus” and a harpsichord solo.

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Bound 2.0

The second of three projected iterations of Against the Grain Theatre’s Bound opened last night at The Great Hall.  Version one was staged but in piano score.  Last night’s version was sung off music stands but with a chamber ensemble and major changes to the music.  It’s going to be interesting to see how the production version, due this time next year shapes up.

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Andrew Haji, Miriam Khalil, Topher Mokrzewski, Justin Welsh, David Trudgen

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Against the Grain 2018/19 season

AtG-Messiah-slideAgainst the Grain Theatre have announced an ambitious 2018/19 season.  There are two main stage shows.  The first is Bound, which had a first workshop outing in December 2017.  It’s still a work-in-progress but there have been significant developments.  Kevin Lau has been commissioned to inject his contemporary themes, music and ideas into the original music by Handel.  Instead of piano there will be a chamber orchestra led by AtG Music Director Topher Mokrzewski with digital sound artist Acote.  The cast will include soprano Miriam Khalil, countertenor David Trudgen, tenor Andrew Haji, and baritone Justin Welsh.  This workshop will be presented in Longboat Hall at The Great Hall (1087 Queen Street West) on November 19th, 20th and 21st, 2018.  For me, the acid test will be whether the dramaturgy and the text has been tightened up.

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Handel’s Alexander’s Feast

Amanda-Forsythe-Credit-Arielle-DonesonHandel’s Alexander’s Feast is an oratorio to a text by Newburgh Hamilton based closely on an earlier Dryden St. Cecilia’s Day ode.  The basic plot is that Alexander is feasting in captured Persepolis with his mistress Thaïs.  Inflamed by the music of Timotheus he decides to burn down the city in revenge for his fallen soldiers.  Cecilia descends from Heaven and substitutes music for the king’s barbarous intentions.  There are solo and choral numbers and a couple of duets and there are two concerti; one for triple harp representing Timotheus’ lyre playing and an organ concerto for St. Cecilia.  It’s all quite tuneful and interesting if not as inspired as some of the better known oratorios.

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Feast free with Alexander!

So this Thursday (Feb 22nd) at 8pm Tafelmusik are presenting Handel’s Alexander’s Feast at Koerner Hall.  Chances to see Handel oratorios, other than Messiah, don’t come around that often and this one has a very decent line up of soloists; Amanda Forsythe, Alexander Dobson and Thomas Hobbs.  And we have a special giveaway offer.  Tafelmusik have provided a pair of tickets for readers of this blog.  Comment below or email me (j DOT gilks AT rogers DOT com) with contact details and I’ll put your name in the hat.  I’ll announce the winner tomorrow evening.  The winner will be able to pick the tickets up at the box office before the show.  If you can’t make Thursday there are also performances on Friday, Saturday and Sunday but no freebies for those!

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Tafelmusik Baroque Choir – Photo: Sian Richards

Into the back half of February and beyond

eded64_558606377878465db0281238f5aa4ea9Here is what’s coming up.  Valentine’s day sees two vocal recitals.  At noon in the RBA there’s Clare de Sévigné and Rachel Andrist with The Truth about Love; the story of a young woman’s love gone awry.  At 8pm Ian Bostridge has an all Schubert program at Koerner Hall.  Thursday is also busy with members of the Ensemble Studio in a Russian program in the RBA at noon, a Johannes Debus masterclass at UoT at 2pm and Opera Trivia at the Four Seasons Centre at 7pm.  Then on Friday at 7.30pm in Walter Hall there’s a free concert; Vocalini, from the undergrads of the UoT Opera.  Also Thursday and Friday MYOpera have a couple of opportunities to see emerging artists.  There’s a public masterclass with Philip Morehead at 6pm Thursday at the Edward Jackman Centre and a concert at 7.30pm Friday at the Vandenberg House.

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Bound

InfinityPoster.Black.Flat.12-12-2017-01_previewThe first performance of Against the Grain Theatre’s Bound took place at the Jackman Studio at the COC.  It’s the first public airing of the piece in piano score, as a workshop, so it’s not the finished product.  The performance was followed by a lively discussion about the work’s potential and future avenues to explore.

I think it’s fair to say that Bound ventures into more serious territory than we have yet seen from this company, dealing as it does with the fraught relationship between the state and the individual in an age when the state, egged on by the right wing media, uses fear of terrorism to suppress “dissidents”.

The space where the audience assembles before the show is liberally decorated with propaganda for The State of the “fear anything that looks different” variety.  In the performance venue itself the audience is ranked either side of a space that contains the piano and, at intervals around the large empty floor, seven chairs; one for each detainee.  The detainees are all being held for things which aren’t actually crimes but bring them under suspicion; wearing a hijab, having a Nazi great-uncle, wanting to emigrate to Sri Lanka, converting to Islam, having a terrorist brother, protesting immigration restrictions, being transgendered.  They are posed essentially unanswerable Kafkaesque questions by the State interrogator (Martha Burns) sitting off in one corner with a microphone.  The only answer is to express frustration and despair and, occasionally, defiance and hope in arias using Handel’s music and words by either Handel’s librettist or Joel Ivany.  Some of the music has been somewhat reshaped by Kevin Lau who also wrote/arranged the final ensemble number.

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