The Harlequin Salon

05-harlequin-750x397-extended-rightThe idea of recreating an accademia musicale (private concert) at the home of Roman artist/patron Pier Leone Ghezzi in 1723 and putting on works that might have been played at such an event is an intriguing one.  Add to that that we were promised caricatures; Ghezzi being a noted pioneer of the form.  Marco Cera, who conceived the show, seemed to be onto a good thing.

What we actually got wasn’t exactly what I expected.  There were the musicians, including noted baroque soprano Roberta Invernizzi, impersonating Ghezzi’s guests; from Vivaldi to Farinelli, with Cera himself as Ghezzi.  But there was also Ghezzi’s servant, played as Harlequin, acted by Dino Gonçalves.  The show was heavy on Harlequin’s cheeky chappy clowning which was, as the lemur put it, like “watching Jerry Lewis channelling Roger Rabbit”.  Not really my thing.

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Glenn Gould School’s Die Fledermaus

Die Fledermaus offers a lot scope for reinterpretation.  Like so many works involving spoken dialogue there is a tradition of reworking that dialogue to work in contemporary humour and geographic relevance to the point where there is no canonical version though there’s probably a set of general expectations.  Joel Ivany’s production for the Glenn Gould School, which opened last night at Koerner Hall, goes further than most to create a “play within a play” dynamic riffing to some extent on the difficulty of staging an opera in a concert hall.  He also makes the decision to use English dialogue but have the sung text in the original German (except for the finale).

GGS Opera 2018 Die Fledermaus #1; Lisa Sakulensky Photography

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Modern Ruin

There’s always something a bit new and different from Against the Grain Theatre and often it’s a pleasant surprise.  So I was prepared to take a punt on a collaboration between them and “baroque-pop” artist Kyrie Kristmanson around the launch of her new CD Modern Ruin.

modernruin

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AtG season announcement

Against the Grain Theatre have announced the line up for their 2017/18 season.  First up is a workshop of a Handel mash up called BOUND.  It’s a collaboration with composer Kevin Lau and will explore aspects of the refugee crisis through Handel’s music as well as contemporary real life stories.  It’s the beginning of a three year concept to production cycle.  The workshop cast will include soprano Danika Lorèn, tenor Asitha Tennekoon, counter-tenor David Trudgen, baritone Justin Welsh, bass Michael Uloth, mezzo-soprano Victoria Marshall and soprano Miriam Khalil. It will play at the COC’s Jackman Studio on December 14, 15, and 16, 2017.

marcy

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Artsong ReGENERATION 2

Yesterday we got the second recital by the song fellows of the Toronto Summer Music Festival.  In the week since the first concert they have been working with mentor Soile Isokoski and it showed in the programming.  There was quite a bit of Strauss and more Finnish and Swedish music than I have ever heard in such a recital.  Among other things this highlighted just how difficult Strauss songs are to sing well.  They are exceedingly tricky yet have to sound absolutely effortless.  Three of the four sopranos on show tried.  None of them succeeded completely(*).  So it goes.  And so to the details.

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Artsong ReGENERATION 1

Toronto Summer Music Festival has two “apprenticeship” programmes; one for chamber musicians and one for singers and collaborative pianists.  The latter is directed by Martin Katz and Steven Philcox.  On Saturday afternoon in Walter Hall we got our first chance to see this year’s young artists.  Eight singers and four pianists were on show.  The singers were a mix of those who are well known to anyone who follows student opera in Toronto and newcomers.  The pianists were all new to me.

Art Song reGENERATION July 15

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Collectìf

Danika Lorèn and co. aka Collectìf were back today with a lunctime show in the RBA.  Like their previous shows this was a themed, more or less staged, series of art songs.  This program was inspired by Verlaine’s Fêtes galantes and featured all French texts set by a range of composers.  Most of it was pretty typical chansons of the fin de siècle; material I find pleasant enough but not especially compelling.  The surprise, and a very welcome one, was four pieces by Reynaldo Hahn setting texts by Charles, duc d’Orléans and Faullin de Banville.  Here Hahn turned his flair for vocal and pianistic colour to great effect producing pieces strangely evocative of the Renaissance.  Fancifully perhaps, I could imagine these being sung at the court of Philip the Good (assuming of course that he had a piano…)

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