Meet the Orchestra Academy

Yesterday’s concert in the RBA, the first I’ve been to in a while, featured the five members of the Orchestra Academy; violinists Joella Pinto and Gloria Yip, violist Carolyn Farnand and cellists Erin Patterson and Alison Rich, with Joel Allison and Samuel Chan and Rachael Kerr on keyboards.  It was an interesting concert in many ways.  We don’t get to see the young instrumentalists much nor do we often see Ensemble members sing with a chamber ensemble.  It was also interesting to hear the contrast between Joel’s dark toned bass-baritone, often singing in a very low tessitura, with Sam’s much brighter, lighter baritone which sometimes was well up in tenor territory.

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Best Glyndebourne martyrdom since 1998

I’m not, in the normal run of things, a huge fan of obscure bel canto operas.  A very long list of them languish in obscurity for very good reasons.  So, my hopes were not all that high when I stuck the 2015 Glyndebourne recording of Donizetti’s Poliuto in the player.  I was wrong.  This is probably the best martyrdom opera from Glyndebourne since Peter Sellars’ production of Theodora in 1998.

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Who killed Adriana?

whokilledadrianaThe annual Student Composer Collective opera at UoT is, as far as I know, unique.  A libretto is written.  The work is divided up and student composers write music for their assigned section(s).  The finished work is presented fully staged with orchestra.  In recent years the libretto and direction has come from Michael Patrick Albano, as was the case with this year’s effort presented in the MacMillan Theatre yesterday afternoon.  Who Killed Adriana riffs off Cilea’s Adriana Lecouvreur.  Adriana Amaro, a very divaish diva, is making her Covent Garden debut as Adriana.  In the first half of the show, set backstage between Acts 2 and 3, we see her waspishly putting down all the other characters before making her grand entrance.  This time though the poisoned violets of the final scene are just that and the second part is a whodunnit search for the murderer. Along the way no stock opera joke is left unused.  Tenors are neurotic, understudies insecure, managers harassed, fans obsessive, there are fake Italians and so on.  But in typical Albano style it works and provides a coherent, and at times very funny, plot line for the composers to work with.  And some of the jokes were new.  Adriana’s chauffeur, Umlaut, is revealed as the answer to every Austrian’s prayer; the inventor of musical strudel.

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Hosokawa double bill

hosokawaThis year’s featured composer in UoT’s New Music Festival is Toshio Hosokawa.  Last night saw performances of two of his one act operas in Walter Hall in productions by filmmaker Paramita Nath, with the composer in the hall.  The first was a monodrama setting of Poe’s The Raven featuring Kristina Szabó and a student ensemble conducted by Gregory Oh.  It’s an interesting piece.  Hosokawa’s sound world combines the European avant-garde with Japanese elements so it’s unlike anything I’ve heard from a North American composer.  It’s dramatic and atmospheric and works really well with fevered nature of Poe’s text.  He also writes well for the voice with a variety of demands from whispering, through speech to full on singing.  All of this coped with admirably by Szabó who, as ever, seemed perfectly at home with whatever the composer threw at her.

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The Harlequin Salon

05-harlequin-750x397-extended-rightThe idea of recreating an accademia musicale (private concert) at the home of Roman artist/patron Pier Leone Ghezzi in 1723 and putting on works that might have been played at such an event is an intriguing one.  Add to that that we were promised caricatures; Ghezzi being a noted pioneer of the form.  Marco Cera, who conceived the show, seemed to be onto a good thing.

What we actually got wasn’t exactly what I expected.  There were the musicians, including noted baroque soprano Roberta Invernizzi, impersonating Ghezzi’s guests; from Vivaldi to Farinelli, with Cera himself as Ghezzi.  But there was also Ghezzi’s servant, played as Harlequin, acted by Dino Gonçalves.  The show was heavy on Harlequin’s cheeky chappy clowning which was, as the lemur put it, like “watching Jerry Lewis channelling Roger Rabbit”.  Not really my thing.

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A Canadian in Rossini?

Yes, there is a Rossini opera with a Canadian character.  Well, OK it’s a bit ambiguous whether he’s Canadian or American and the librettist doesn’t seem quite sure that they aren’t the same thing.  Anyway, likely the earliest of an appearance of a Canadian in opera unless one counts the Les sauvages d’Amérique section of Rameau’s Les Indes Galantes.  The opera is the early one act comedy, La cambiale di matrimonio.  It’s a bit of a one trick pony.  An English merchant has contracted to marry his daughter to the Canadian, Snook, but she’s already unofficially engaged to another.  After much faffing about Snook makes the contract over to the other suitor and makes him his heir.  The joke, such as it is, is that all this is carried out in the language of commercial contracts.  For example, when Snook minds out that Fanny is engaged he considers the “merchandise” to be “mortgaged” and so on.  Still it provides a back drop for some showy singing and the usual rapid fire Rossini ensemble numbers.

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