Carmen at the Opéra comique

Bizet’s Carmen premiered at the Opéra Comique in Paris in 1875.  In 2009 it was revived there in a production by Adrian Noble.  That production was filmed for TV and has now been released on disk.  Having watched it I’m asking myself whether it’s an attempt in some way to “recreate” something similar to the 1875 experience.  Alas, there’s nothing in the documentation to help with this question either way but two things intrigued me. The Orchestre Révolutionnaire et Romantique is in the pit which suggests an attempt to get a “period sound”.  Secondly, the spoken dialogue is not the version I’m accustomed to and there’s quite a bit more of it.  Is this, perhaps, the original 1875 dialogue?

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“Traditional” La Bohème?

Richard Jones’ production of Puccini’s La Bohème recorded at the Royal Opera House in 2020 is, at first glance, a highly conventional “traditional” La Bohème.  There’s no subtext.  The story unfolds strictly in line with the libretto.  And yet there’s something going on that raises it above the level of the typical canary fanciers’ La Bohème.  Ultimately I think it’s a combination of avoiding sentimentality or glitz or glamour and really focussing on the characters and the relationships between them.  It seems that the revival direction team of Julia Burbach and Simon Iorio and the cast have really worked on this.

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Harnoncourt 2 – Don Giovanni

Nikolaus Harnoncourt’s 2014 cycle of the Da Ponte operas continues with Don Giovanni.  The recording has much in common with his Le nozze di Figaro, even down to the same essay in the booklet, and I’m not going to repeat what I wrote in that review.  If you haven’t read it, I recommend a look before reading the rest of this.

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Distorted mirrors

Watching the recently released recording of the 2017 production of Giodarno’s Andrea Chénier from La Scala had me wondering why this piece isn’t done more often.  If it had been written by Puccini, and it might well have been, it would get done as often as Tosca, with which it has many similarities.  In the conscience stricken revolutionary Gérard it has one of the few multi-dimensional characters in verismo opera and the music, for Chénier in particular, has all the qualities that people listen to Puccini for.  I guess perhaps one needs at least a rough understanding of the events of the French revolution to really follow the plot as Giodarno, unlike Puccini, roots his work in actual history but still.  Opera fashion is very odd.(*)

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McVicar’s Faust revived

It’s quite unusual for a production to be released twice on video but that’s what has happened with David McVicar’s production of Gounod’s Faust for the Royal Opera House.  It was originally released in 2010 with a cast that included Roberto Alagna, Bryn Terfel and Angela Gheorghiu.  It’s now been released again in a revival directed by Bruno Ravella with a cast headlined by Michael Fabiano, Erwin Schrott and Irina Lungu filmed in 2019.

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Alceste in Munich

I really wonder why Gluck’s Alceste gets as many productions as it does.  The plot is essentially dull (summarised in this review) and I really can’t see an angle that could be used to make it interesting and relevant to today’s audience in the way that one can with such classical stories as Antigone,  Medea or Idomeneo.  The music, bar a handful of numbers, is not very exciting either.

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Cavalli at the court of Louis XIV

Cavalli’s Ercole Amante is an oddity.  It was intended as a wedding present from Cardinal Mazarin to Louis XIV but got hijacked by Lully who inserted a bunch of ballets for the king to dance stretching out the piece to something like six hours.  It wasn’t a great success.  It’s also a very odd story for a piece intended for a royal patron as I explained in reviewing an earlier recording.  It’s also in Italian which may make the only French court work to be performed in that language.

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Fidelio 1806

There were, of course, many Beethoven 250 events planned for 2020 and few of them happened.  One, planned for Vienna, was to stage all three versions of Beethoven’s only opera; Leonore (1805), Fidelio (1806) and the final form that modern audiences mostly know, Fidelio (1814).  As far as I know the only one that went ahead was a production of the 1806 version at the Theater an der Wien that was filmed in an empty house and has just got a release on Blu-ray and DVD.  Now, it happens that the 1805 Leonore was staged and recorded by Lafayette Opera in New York the year before.  So we can look at all three versions and the evolution of the piece despite the Vienna cancellations.  For those who want more details on the New York production, it was reviewed by Patrick Dillon in the summer 2020 edition of Opera Canada and there will be a review, by myself, of the recording in a future edition (probably soon).

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The Fiery Angel

Once in a while an opera video comes my way that’s so bonkers that I hardly know how to describe it.  Emma Dante’s production of Prokofiev’s The Fiery Angel; recorded at Teatro dell’opera di Roma in 2019 would be a candidate for the most bonkers of all!

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La Dori

Pietro Antonio Cesti’s 1657 dramma musicale La Dori is a hoot.  It seems to prefigure every plot device that will ever be used in opera.  A baby sold by bandits who turns out to be a princess.  Pirates. A ghost. Mistaken identities.  Swapped potions. Men pretending to be women.  Women pretending to be men.  Love polygons of fiendish complexity.  I won’t even attempt to explain the plot because it’s very complex and silly and hardly matters.  It took me a half page diagram just to map the relationships between the characters.

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