Looking ahead

Bundesarchiv_Bild_146-2005-0119,_Kurt_WeillThings are starting to liven up again in the Toronto scene.  Here’s a look ahead to the balance of September and the first half of October.  This week sees a performance of Weill’s Little Mahagonny by VOICEBOX at Gallery 345.  That’s on Tuesday 25th at 7.30pm and will be followed by a wine and cheese reception. Tickets are available at Eventbrite.

The COC season opens on the 30th with Tchaikovsky’s Eugene Onegin featuring Gordon Bintner, Joseph Kaiser and Joyce El-Khoury.  There are eight performances ending on 3rd Novemeber.  The companion work is the premier run of Rufus Wainwright’s Hadrian which opens on October 13th.  It’s a starry cast including Thomas Hampson and Karita Matilla.  There are seven performances ending October 27th.

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September

princess2It’s September and the long, slow awakening after the annual aestivation begins.  There’s not a lot on yet but what there is is interesting.  The middle of the month sees Native Earth’s production of I Call myself Princess at the Aki Studio; previews from 9th to 12th September with official opening on the 13th and then shows until the end of the month.  My interview with playwright Jani Lauzon is here.  Also opening on the 13th is Tapestry Briefs at the Ernest Balmer Studio.  Hear the product of the LibLab, hear Stephanie Tritchew, Teiya Kasahara, Peter McGillivray and Keith Klassen and eat tapas.  It runs until the 16th.

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TSMF opener

The Toronto Summer Music Festival opened last night at Koerner Hall with a concert by the Escher Quartet who came in at quite short notice for the venerable Borodins who had to pull out due to illness.  The theme of this year’s festival is “Reflections of Wartime” as perhaps befits the 100th anniversary of the Great War.  That said, I’m not sure how last night’s programme fitted the theme.  None of Schumann’s Quartet no.1, Shostakovich’s Quartet no. 9 nor Tchaikovsky’s Quartet no. 1 have any obvious war references.

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Not a review

This afternoon I saw Gerry Finley and Julius Drake in recital at Koerner Hall.  In other words, two supreme exponents of the art of lieder at the top of their game in a hall with near perfect acoustics.  They performed Beethoven and Schubert settings of Goethe texts, some Tchaikovsky and some Rachmaninoff, which gave Julius ample opportunity to show off.  They finished up with settings of folky things by Copland, Barber, Respighi and Britten.  The last was The Crocodile; a very silly and funny piece I hadn’t heard before.  The encore was by Healey Willans and Gerry gave a very nice plug for the Canadian Art Song Project.  Insert standard list of adjectival phrases describing top notch singing and accompaniment.  My humble scribing is not worthy.

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Not taken today.  My phone pictures were awful

Fifth annual Krehm memorial concert

Last night was the fifth concert in memory of Rachel Krehm’s sister Elizabeth.  This year it was held in the rather cavernous and imposing Christ Church Deer Park, an Anglican church at Yonge and St. Clair.  The concert opened with an elegiac piece for strings written by Jean Coulthard for the coronation of Elizabeth II.  Then Rachel gave us a beautiful and moving account of Mahler’s Rückert Lieder.  Um Mitternacht(*) is a particular favourite of mine and seemed especially fitting here.  It was the full orchestral setting with Evan Mitchell conducting his extraordinary orchestra.  They were back after the break for a thoroughly compelling account of Tchaikovsky’s great sixth symphony Pathétique.  What’s remarkable is that this isn’t an orchestra that has a permanent basis.  It’s a group of musicians who come together for these concerts and make great music on modest rehearsal time.  It’s especially impressive that these things always seem to happen in huge churches with churchy acoustics rather than a concert hall and they still sound terrific.  As in previous years, this was a fund raiser for the ICU at St. Mike’s and once again it looked like mission accomplished as there was a very decent audience in the church.

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Azaleas, Roses and Lilacs

Elena Tsallagova and Sandra Horst entertained the crowd in the RBA yesterday with a flower themed recital of French and Russian songs.  It was a very well chosen selection that allowed Ms. Tsallagova to display her versatility.  From Debussy’s quite operatic Rondel chinois, where she showed a lot of power for a young lyric soprano, through the varied moods of Bizet’s Feuilles d’album where by turns she was dramatic, sombre and very playful.  Throughout she was extremely demonstrative while managing excellent phrasing and impeccable French.  She has an interesting range of colours too, from extremely bright through to quite covered and dark and she’s not afraid to use them.  Actually, the way she threw herself into the material I don’t think she is afraid of much!

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