A couple of things

werther-nzkrkplp.v3wThe Art Song Foundation of Canada has launched a new free on-line magazine called, somewhat unsurprisingly, Art Song Canada.  The first issue has three articles including a very interesting one by Gerald Finley.  You can sign up for it and see the first issue here.

A listing I missed on the weekend… On November 25th at 2.30pm in the Jane Mallet Theatre, VOICEBOX:Opera in Concert are presenting Massenet’s Werther with Matt Chittick in the title role,  Isabel Bayrakdarian as Charlotte and Brett Polegato as Albert.  Narmina Afandiyeva directs from the piano.

Not a review

This afternoon I saw Gerry Finley and Julius Drake in recital at Koerner Hall.  In other words, two supreme exponents of the art of lieder at the top of their game in a hall with near perfect acoustics.  They performed Beethoven and Schubert settings of Goethe texts, some Tchaikovsky and some Rachmaninoff, which gave Julius ample opportunity to show off.  They finished up with settings of folky things by Copland, Barber, Respighi and Britten.  The last was The Crocodile; a very silly and funny piece I hadn’t heard before.  The encore was by Healey Willans and Gerry gave a very nice plug for the Canadian Art Song Project.  Insert standard list of adjectival phrases describing top notch singing and accompaniment.  My humble scribing is not worthy.

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Not taken today.  My phone pictures were awful

What’s on in April

marcyApril is a busy month for fully staged opera.  Canadian Opera opens two productions and there are shows from Opera Atelier, Against the Grain and Essential Opera.  First up is the COC’s revival of Robert Lepage’s production of Stravinsky’s The Nightingale and Other Short Fables.  This opens on April 13th and runs to May 13th.  In 2009 it sold out so this time there are nine performances.  Also at the COC there’s Donizetti’s Anna Bolena completing the Tudor trilogy.  It opens on April 28th with nine performances closing May 26th.

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The actual, for real, COC 2018/19 season

chemistexplaThis just in:

The fall season will open with Tchaikovsky’s Eugene Onegin in the Carsen production as predicted yesterday.  The (pleasant) surprise is that Gordon Bintner will sing the title role.  Joyce El-Khoury sings Tatiana and Joseph Kaiser is Lensky.  Johannes Debus conducts.

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Resurrection

resurrectionThis review first appeared in the print edition of Opera Canada.

The 1994 recording of Peter Maxwell Davies’ opera Resurrection, previously released on Collins has now been re-released on the Naxos label. It’s a hugely ambitious and somewhat confusing work; even harder to get to grips with on CD than it might be with visuals. It’s an anarchic parody of establishment figures and attitudes executed via a pastiche of multiple musical styles.

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Nobody vomits on Dolly Parton’s shoes

I’ve tried several times in the past to watch the DVD recording of Mark-Anthony Turnage’s Anna Nicole and never made it past the second scene, which is revolting and, I still think, rather patronising.  This time though I made it all the way through and I think, taken as a whole, this is a pretty impressive piece with a clever libretto and some real musical depth.  It’s also, in the true and technical sense, a tragedy, and a very operatic one at that.

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Tell stripped of Romanticism

Damiano Michieletto’s production of Rossini’s Guillaume Tell at the Royal Opera House in 2015 was controversial because of the replacement of the Act 3 scene where Austrian soldiers force Swiss girls to dance with them with something far more explicit.  It is a tough scene to watch but it’s absolutely consistent with a very thoughtful overall approach to the piece.  After all what do occupying troops do with village girls?  The director, rightly I think, sees the piece as being about the brutality of military occupation and colonialism but also recognises that the Tell legend, especially in its Schiller version is overlaid with euphemising Romanticism.  Michieletto’s production both strips away and draws attention to the Romanticisation.  He sets the piece in a roughly contemporary setting.  To me, the civilians look 1950s but Gesler’s men look more modern.  The actual action is played out unsentimentally, indeed brutally, in this time period.  The ballets, one of the principal euphemising agents, are all replaced by more realistic action.  To draw attention to how the legend has been transmitted two devices are introduced.  Tell’s son Jemmy has a comic book version of Schiller which he consults at key points and there’s a silent character; medieval Tell, straight out of the legend with feathered cap etc who appears whenever the morale of actual Tell or the Swiss in general needs a boost.  It sounds a bit corny but it really does the job.

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