A Canadian in Rossini?

Yes, there is a Rossini opera with a Canadian character.  Well, OK it’s a bit ambiguous whether he’s Canadian or American and the librettist doesn’t seem quite sure that they aren’t the same thing.  Anyway, likely the earliest of an appearance of a Canadian in opera unless one counts the Les sauvages d’Amérique section of Rameau’s Les Indes Galantes.  The opera is the early one act comedy, La cambiale di matrimonio.  It’s a bit of a one trick pony.  An English merchant has contracted to marry his daughter to the Canadian, Snook, but she’s already unofficially engaged to another.  After much faffing about Snook makes the contract over to the other suitor and makes him his heir.  The joke, such as it is, is that all this is carried out in the language of commercial contracts.  For example, when Snook minds out that Fanny is engaged he considers the “merchandise” to be “mortgaged” and so on.  Still it provides a back drop for some showy singing and the usual rapid fire Rossini ensemble numbers.

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Bartoli’s Rosina

It’s a bit hard to believe, but, as far as I can tell, the only available video recording of Cecilia Bartoli singing Rosina in Rossini’s Il barbiere di Siviglia is a 1988 recording made at Schwetzingen when she was 22 years old.  It’s pretty typical of Michael Hampe’s productions of that period; traditional, elegant, symmetrical and generally well composed, but nothing terribly insightful.  It’s also rather dark and grey in places which taxes the recording technology of the period sorely.

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Dream Cendrillon

Massenet’s Cendrillon is an interesting take on the Cinderella story.  There are a lot of references in the libretto, especially in acts 3 and 4, to suggest that it’s all really a dream. So maybe it’s not unreasonable for Barbara Mundel and Olga Motta in their 2017 Freiburg production to riff of that and give us elements that don’t, at first blush, make sense.  Dreams are like that. It would also explain why, in many scenes, Lucette seems to be more of a spectator than a participant.

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Nabucco a la Visconti

I guess Verdi’s Nabucco is even more closely associated with the Risorgimento than his other works so it’s not perhaps surprising that, for his 2017 production for Verona, Arnaud Bernard made the connection explicit.  We are in Milan during the Five Days.  La Scala; which does duty as the Temple, the Hanging Gardens and itself, stands in the middle of the huge performance space of the Arena di Verona.  Italian and Austrian soldiers, including cavalry, ride around the arena or clamber over the terraces.  It’s wild and spectacular but it’s more than that.

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La scala di seta

So here’s another Rossini one act farsa from Schwetzingen.  It’s a 1990 La scala di seta in, inevitably, a production by Michal Hampe.  It’s predictably pretty to look at and well constructed dramaturgically.  The Paris background is a nice touch.  There’s some fine singing and energetic fooling from Alessandro Corbelli as the servant Germano.  The principal quartet of lovers; Luciana Serra, David Kuebler, Jane Bunnel and Alberto Rinaldi backed up by David Griffith as the girls’ guardian are stylish and toss off the various quick fire ensembles with aplomb.  Gianluigi Gelmetti and the Radio-Sinfonieorchester Stuttgart round things out with an equally accomplished reading.  So there it is, straightforward Rossini in a typical Hampe production pulled of nicely in Scwetzingen’s elegant rococo theatre.

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The other Naples opera

There are two girls and two guys.  The guys are not who they appear to be.  Nobody is sure who is pairing off with who and there’s a scheming servant.  And we are in Naples.  You know the opera of course.  It’s Rossini’s L’occasione fa il ladre. It’s one of Rossini’s early one act farsi for La Fenice and it’s quite good, if very silly.  There are plenty of musical high jinks with fast paced ensembles and some wicked coloratura.  And it has an unambiguously happy ending.  You will also likely recognise some of the music as, in best Rossini fashion, he used chunks of it in later works.

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500

I reached the milestone of 400 DVD/Blu-ray reviews on June 20th 2016.  The 500 mark came up last weekend.  Let’s see how the stats have evolved.

500-languageItalian has increased its lead to 35% with German now on exactly 25%.  English has dropped marginally to 12%, despite its prominence in contemporary works.  I think multiple Salzburg Mozart cycles are playing a role here. Continue reading