Telephone double bill

The third of Saturday night’s webstreams was Toronto City Opera’s double bill of Menotti’s The Telephone and Poulenc’s La voix humaine. The choice of rep makes sense in that it meant that very few people had to be assembled in the Ernest Balmer Studio where the recordings took place though it also looks a bit odd for a company that in normal times is about participation.

The Menotti is essentially a rather weak joke stretched out for half an hour. A man is trying to propose to a girl but every time he gets close to popping the question she either receives or makes a phone call. I thought it was a bit feeble the first time I saw it and it doesn’t wear well. It doesn’t help that it’s hard to imagine anyone wanting to marry this utterly boring girl except, perhaps, her utterly banal suitor. I guess the basic problem is that anything trying to be “realistic” from the US in the 50s and 60s is almost bound to be dull as just about any interesting aspect of human life was off limits due to various kinds of censorship. Anyway, I think TCO got as much out of the piece as there is to be got. The contemporary updating had its witty moments and both Nicole Dubinsky and Johnathan Kirby; backed up by Ivan Jovanovic gave strong performances in the singing and acting departments.

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Tales of Hoffmann at Toronto City Opera

Toronto City Opera’s latest show, at the Al Green Theatre, is Offenbach’s Tales of Hoffmann.  It’s a pretty good choice for TCO since, even with cuts, there’s plenty of fun stuff for the chorus to do and  Jessica Derventzis’ production keeps a good chunk of them on stage pretty much throughout.  The production concept is straightforward.  It gets a late 19th century setting and the three acts are framed as presenting Hoffmann’s story to the group of drunken students.  It’s unfussy and works.

Toronto City Opera, Les Comptes d'Hoffmann

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La Traviata at TCO

Toronto City Opera opened a run of three performances of Verdi’s La Traviata at the Al Green Theatre last night.  It’s a bit of a mixed bag.  Certainly less even than their Le nozze di Figaro earlier in the season.  Director Alaina Viau sets the piece in contemporary Toronto which creates both possibilities and problems.  I’ll come back to that because I want to talk about the performances first.

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Nozze at Toronto City Opera

Toronto City Opera has been around for a while but its previous performance location at the Bickford Centre was quite sufficient to keep me away.  The Miles Nadal JCC is quite another matter.  The basic idea of TCO is that the chorus is open to, essentially, anybody and that their subscriptions, plus fund raising, allow the company to do a couple of staged shows each year with young professional soloists, director, conductor and pianist.  So, in theory it’s a chorus centric endeavour so the choice of Le Nozze di Figaro seems a bit odd since it has less than ten minutes of chorus and that is usually covered by a small group of eight or so ladies.  That said, Nozze is their first of two productions this season and I saw the last show in the run this afternoon.

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The Fatal Gaze

The Fatal Gaze is, in a way, a follow up to last year’s UoT Opera show Last Days in that it consists of a staged performance of pieces of vocal music to a theme.  This time the theme is the dangers of seeing or being seen and there’s quite a lot to unpack.  The music all lies on an arc from Monteverdi to Gluck and the stories are all taken from classical mythology or thee Bible with some commentary from more modern figures.

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