Hello sailor!

Jonathan Dove’s 1994 one act opera Siren Song is a twisted little piece and very enjoyable.  Apparently it’s based on a true story which just makes it weirder.  Its the mid 1980s.  Davey Palmer is an Able Seaman on HMS Ark Royal.  He answers an ad in Navy News from a young woman, Diana, seeking a pen pal.  Diana is a model and the relationship gets quite steamy but somehow whenever Davey gets shore leave there is some reason why Diana can’t meet him.  Soon Diana’s brother Jonathan is showing up to make the excuses.  Diana has throat cancer and can’t make phone calls and on it goes until the nature of the phone calls between Davey and Jonathan leads the MOD police to investigate a possible homosexual relationship.  Surprise!  There is no Diana and Jonathan is a con man.  It’s very cleverly constructed with Diana appearing as a character though, we realise eventually, only in Davey’s imagination and the the pacing is such that our suspicion builds rather than the denouement being a huge surprise.

Photo: Nicola Betts

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Bon Appétit

Muse 9 Production’s new show Bon Appétit: A Musical Tasting Menu couples three short operas about food and was, appropriately enough, presented at Merchants of Green Coffee on Matilda Street.  Perhaps “opera” isn’t the right term as, although each piece was fully staged, they featured only one singer each.  “Opera” or “staged song”?  I don’t really care as they were fun.

BonAppetit1

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Charlotte

Two years ago Charlotte: A Tri-Coloured Play with Music was presented in workshop form (more or less) at Luminato.  It felt incomplete and rather muddled then and I didn’t write about it.  I saw the latest version yesterday at Hart House Theatre and it feels like a finished piece; indeed a rather accomplished one.

It’s a genre defying work.  Perhaps it’s closer to musical theatre than anything else but it’s not miked and there are some “operatic” moments worked into the plot.  Indeed there are some very funny musical moments and much cleverness in Aleš Březina’s score and Alon Nasman’s libretto.

Charlotte, Theaturtle

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Norcop Prize recital

Walter Hall at lunchtime today saw the annual recital for the winners of the Norcop Prize in song and the Williams Koldofsky Prize in Accompanying.  The winners this year were baritone Korin Thomas-Smith and pianist Joy Lee.  It was a very well constructed recital.  It was all English language and consisted of three sets of highly contrasted moods.

norcoprecital

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Glenn Gould School Vocal Showcase

It’s always an interesting evening.  It’s the first chance of the year to see what the Conservatory has to offer.  The first thing I noticed was that the tenor famine seems to be over.  There were four tenors on offer to two baritones.  Just the one mezzo though and more sopranos than I could count.

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So many sopranos..

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Dada dada

This year’s GGS School fall opera was a presentation of three short works influenced by Dada and surrealism.  The first was Martinů’s Les larmes du couteau.  It’s a hard work to describe.  Here’s what naxos.com has to offer:

Eleanor longs to marry someone like the Hanged Man, whose body is suspended over the stage. Satan appears, professing love for Eleanor, who rejects him, still longing for the Hanged Man, to which Satan now marries her, an event she celebrates by dancing a tango. A Negro Cyclist appears and Satan assumes the latter’s form. Eleanor seeks to attract the Negro/Satan, while her Mother makes gymnastic gestures at the back of the stage. Eleanor kisses the Negro, whose head bursts open, revealing Satan. Eleanor, terrified, stabs herself and the Hanged Man starts to dance to a foxtrot, as his head and limbs are detached, for him to juggle with. He comes to life and embraces Eleanor, but when she kisses him his head bursts open and the face of Satan is seen. She gives up her pursuit of love, while the Mother claims to know how to win Satan’s love, only to be rejected.

Les Larmes du couteau is very short in duration and offered obvious problems in staging, to be solved, it has been suggested, by the use of film.

Photo: Nicola Betts

Kateryna Khartova and Rachel Miller in Tears of the Knife

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Beautiful Helen

Offenbach’s La belle Hélène, given in English translation, opened at Toronto Operetta Theatre last night.  The production by Guillermo Silva-Marin is an uncomplicated and fast paced romp.  There a few cuts.  The scene with Orestes and his girls for instance is gone and the dialogue, as is the norm, is gently updated with a Facebook reference and an allusion to a certain orange real estate magnate.

labellehelene

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