Bound 2.0

The second of three projected iterations of Against the Grain Theatre’s Bound opened last night at The Great Hall.  Version one was staged but in piano score.  Last night’s version was sung off music stands but with a chamber ensemble and major changes to the music.  It’s going to be interesting to see how the production version, due this time next year shapes up.

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Andrew Haji, Miriam Khalil, Topher Mokrzewski, Justin Welsh, David Trudgen

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Bound

InfinityPoster.Black.Flat.12-12-2017-01_previewThe first performance of Against the Grain Theatre’s Bound took place at the Jackman Studio at the COC.  It’s the first public airing of the piece in piano score, as a workshop, so it’s not the finished product.  The performance was followed by a lively discussion about the work’s potential and future avenues to explore.

I think it’s fair to say that Bound ventures into more serious territory than we have yet seen from this company, dealing as it does with the fraught relationship between the state and the individual in an age when the state, egged on by the right wing media, uses fear of terrorism to suppress “dissidents”.

The space where the audience assembles before the show is liberally decorated with propaganda for The State of the “fear anything that looks different” variety.  In the performance venue itself the audience is ranked either side of a space that contains the piano and, at intervals around the large empty floor, seven chairs; one for each detainee.  The detainees are all being held for things which aren’t actually crimes but bring them under suspicion; wearing a hijab, having a Nazi great-uncle, wanting to emigrate to Sri Lanka, converting to Islam, having a terrorist brother, protesting immigration restrictions, being transgendered.  They are posed essentially unanswerable Kafkaesque questions by the State interrogator (Martha Burns) sitting off in one corner with a microphone.  The only answer is to express frustration and despair and, occasionally, defiance and hope in arias using Handel’s music and words by either Handel’s librettist or Joel Ivany.  Some of the music has been somewhat reshaped by Kevin Lau who also wrote/arranged the final ensemble number.

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Electric Messiah 3

24796256_10209363243951834_297845718812417344_nSoundstreams Electric Messiah 3 opened last night at the Drake Underground.  Some things have changed from last year.  There’s no chorus, the soloists are new, the instrumentation has changed.  There’s now a harpsichord (Christopher Bagan) and an electric organ (Jeff McLeod)  for instance.  Some things are the same.  There’s still extensive use of electric guitar (John Gzowski).  Dancer Lybido and DJ SlowPitchSound are still there, as is Adam Scime as music director and electro-acoustical wizard.  There’s still a mobile phone schtick.  It feels both familiar and quite different.

The four new soloists each bring something of themselves to the piece.  A kilted Jonathan MacArthur (getting ready for Yaksmas perhaps?) sings partly, and very beautifully, in Scots Gaelic.  Adanya Dunn brings a fresh sound and Bulgarian.  Elizabeth Shepherd  brings jazz, French and a really effective “lounge jazz” He was despised accompanying herself on organ.  Justin Welsh adds some Afro-Canadian touches.  Most of the numbers are shared between the singers; moving and singing from different parts of the small space.  This is exemplified by the opening Comfort ye, begun by Jonathan in Gaelic with singer and language and location constantly shifting.  With no chorus, there’s much more space (and it’s easier to see).  The visual and aural textures seem cleaner.  The unconventional combination of instruments and electronics works really well.  There’s enough Handel there but also much else to think about and enjoy.

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AtG season announcement

Against the Grain Theatre have announced the line up for their 2017/18 season.  First up is a workshop of a Handel mash up called BOUND.  It’s a collaboration with composer Kevin Lau and will explore aspects of the refugee crisis through Handel’s music as well as contemporary real life stories.  It’s the beginning of a three year concept to production cycle.  The workshop cast will include soprano Danika Lorèn, tenor Asitha Tennekoon, counter-tenor David Trudgen, baritone Justin Welsh, bass Michael Uloth, mezzo-soprano Victoria Marshall and soprano Miriam Khalil. It will play at the COC’s Jackman Studio on December 14, 15, and 16, 2017.

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More thoughts on the ending of The Devil Inside

Now that the run is over I can deal with issues that would have been spoilers for anyone going to see the show later in the run.  I think what is most striking about how Welsh has reconstructed Stevenson’s story really comes out in the ending but it’s there all the way through as she constructs different relationships between the three main characters and the bottle.  In the original story only Keawe has any complexity as a character and the ending is something of a cop out; a character who considers himself already damned just shows up and makes the, fatal, final purchase.  Louise Welsh handles this quite differently.

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The Devil indeed

Scottish Opera’s The Devil Inside, presented by Tapestry Opera opened last night at the Harbourfront Centre Theatre.  Expectations were high I think.  This was Scottish Opera’s North American debut and the Glasgow premier of the piece had received enthusiastic reviews in the British press.  How would it  cope with being translated from the relative sophistication of the 1200 seat Theatre Royal Glasgow to the rather spartan 250 seat Harbourfront Theatre?  How would an updating of a short story with Scottish roots by a Scottish composer and librettist translate culturally?  The short answer is very well indeed.  It’s a fine piece and it was very well presented; musically and dramatically.

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The Devil Inside

I met with Tapestry Artistic Director Michael Mori earlier today to talk about the upcoming co-production with Scottish Opera of Stuart MacRae and Louise Welsh’s new opera The Devil Inside.  I’m not familiar with the work of either composer or librettist but each are well regarded in their own spheres; Welsh having made a name for herself with a number of psychological crime novels.  And that seems like a good background for adapting Robert Louis Stevenson’s The Bottle Imp on which the opera is loosely based. The story itself is extremely creepy.  Right up there in fact with, say, James’ The Turn of the Screw, which got turned into a pretty decent opera!

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