Electric Messiah 3

24796256_10209363243951834_297845718812417344_nSoundstreams Electric Messiah 3 opened last night at the Drake Underground.  Some things have changed from last year.  There’s no chorus, the soloists are new, the instrumentation has changed.  There’s now a harpsichord (Christopher Bagan) and an electric organ (Jeff McLeod)  for instance.  Some things are the same.  There’s still extensive use of electric guitar (John Gzowski).  Dancer Lybido and DJ SlowPitchSound are still there, as is Adam Scime as music director and electro-acoustical wizard.  There’s still a mobile phone schtick.  It feels both familiar and quite different.

The four new soloists each bring something of themselves to the piece.  A kilted Jonathan MacArthur (getting ready for Yaksmas perhaps?) sings partly, and very beautifully, in Scots Gaelic.  Adanya Dunn brings a fresh sound and Bulgarian.  Elizabeth Shepherd  brings jazz, French and a really effective “lounge jazz” He was despised accompanying herself on organ.  Justin Welsh adds some Afro-Canadian touches.  Most of the numbers are shared between the singers; moving and singing from different parts of the small space.  This is exemplified by the opening Comfort ye, begun by Jonathan in Gaelic with singer and language and location constantly shifting.  With no chorus, there’s much more space (and it’s easier to see).  The visual and aural textures seem cleaner.  The unconventional combination of instruments and electronics works really well.  There’s enough Handel there but also much else to think about and enjoy.

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Second annual Electric Messiah

Soundstreams’ Electric Messiah, now billed as “annual”, opened last night at a packed Drake Underground.  It’s substantially reworked from last year’s show though structurally it’s similar in that the same arias are sung by the same singers in the same order with similar linking sections.  The differences though are notable.  The space is configured differently with more conventional seating which makes it feel more like a concert than a happening, though there’s still lots of movement and action happening in different parts of the space.  The electro-acoustic orchestra is gone; replaced by keyboards.  John Gzowski and his electric guitar are up on stage rather than tucked away in an alcove.  The linking choral sections have been remixed and the influence of Adam Scime on that is clear.  It’s still a very interesting show and well worth seeing but I enjoyed it rather less than last year.

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Handel plugged in

carlahSoundstreams’ high concept show Electric Messiah opened at the Drake Underground last night.  So what is Electric Messiah?  It’s a potent mix of Handel/Jennens, four exceptional singers from varied backgrounds, electronics, turntable artists and electric guitars.  It’s “staged” in the round in a dive bar with the audience and artists mixed up all over the place.  Curator Kyle Brenders, dramaturg Ashlie Corcoran and lighting designer Patrick Lavender have created something that’s weird and dynamic and exciting and, just occasionally, a bit self indulgent and I really enjoyed it.  Probably my biggest complaint would be that it’s too short at around an hour.

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