La campana sommersa

Respighi’s La campana sommersa is interesting in that it’s one of comparatively few post-Puccini Italian operas to get some sort of traction.  It premiered in Hamburg in 1927 and saw quite a few productions between then and 1939 including one at the Met in 1929.  Then it pretty much descended into obscurity before being revived in 2016 by a co-pro between Teatro Lirico di Cagliari (where the recording reviewed here was made) and the revived (more or less) NYCO (which used the Cagliari orchestra and chorus but American soloists).  It’s based on a symbolist poem by German poet Gerhart Hauptmann and concerns a bell; which has been hoofed into a lake by fauns, a master bell maker who thinks he is the pagan god Balder, a water sprite, Rautendelein, and assorted mortals, elves, witches, fauns and so on.  As with all these works no-one lives happily ever after.

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Not a review

This afternoon I saw Gerry Finley and Julius Drake in recital at Koerner Hall.  In other words, two supreme exponents of the art of lieder at the top of their game in a hall with near perfect acoustics.  They performed Beethoven and Schubert settings of Goethe texts, some Tchaikovsky and some Rachmaninoff, which gave Julius ample opportunity to show off.  They finished up with settings of folky things by Copland, Barber, Respighi and Britten.  The last was The Crocodile; a very silly and funny piece I hadn’t heard before.  The encore was by Healey Willans and Gerry gave a very nice plug for the Canadian Art Song Project.  Insert standard list of adjectival phrases describing top notch singing and accompaniment.  My humble scribing is not worthy.

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Not taken today.  My phone pictures were awful

Whitney Mather in recital

I went to see Whitney Mather sing yesterday afternoon.  It was her second masters degree performance at Walter Hall with David Eliakis at the piano.  (Probably the first time I’ve heard David play a proper piano!)

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It was an interesting and well chosen program that allowed Whitney to demonstrate her musicianship and sensitivity to text.  For the most part it avoided overly obvious territory, starting with Purcell’s rarely heard The Blessed Virgin’s Expostulation which was followed by the obligatory CanCon.  In this case John Greer’s The Red Red Heart; settings of poems by Marianne Bindig.  The Purcell allowed some tasteful decoration and an opportunity to display appropriately baroque style.  The Greer, like so many modern songs, perhaps had more of interest in the piano line than for the voice but it did allow a brief coloratura flourish.

Next up were Respighi’s Quattro Rispetti Toscani to texts by Arturo Birga.  These are rather beautiful songs and should be heard more often.  Whitney brought out both the pathos and humour in the rather rustic (Tuscan dialect?) texts.

After the interval we were on more familiar ground with Schubert’s Der Hirt auf dem Felsen.  Tiago Delgado played the clarinet part quite beautifully and Whitney managed the crazy pace of the piece very well, managing to maintain a clear sense of shape and line.  She wrapped up with Milhaud’s Chansons de Ronsard.  These are a bit of a tour de force.  Some passages are really fast and much of the music lies high in the soprano range.  Whitney may not have the easiest, most beautiful, high notes ever but she does have all the notes and she hit them here with accuracy and without sense of strain.  She was particularly impressive in the crazy fast Tais-toi, babillarde.

All in all not a bad way to spend a late Saturday afternoon!

Howard and Haji

Yesterday afternoon’s Mazzoleni Songmasters concert featured local tenor Andrew Haji and Welsh baritone Jason Howard in a program somewhat loosely linked to England.  Neither singer was, I think, 100% well (Haji’s cold was announced, Howrad’s merely obvious!) but both battled through manfully and gave us some fine singing.  There were some interesting contrasts especially in the first half of the program.  Andrew kicked off with Francesco Santoliquido’s I canti della sera.  I’m no expert on Italian art song but these did sound like songs rather than opera arias, at least in the hands of Andrew and Rachel Andrist.  In contrast, Jason’s set (Tosti’s L’ultima canzone, Respighi’s Nebbie, Tosti’s L’ideale and Verdi’s In solitaria stanza), with Robert Kortgaard sounded distinctly operatic and suited Jason’s darkish voice rather well.

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ARC Ensemble

c-t“Culture Days” is a weekend long festival in Toronto where various arts organisations put on free events.  This year it included a concert in Koerner Hall by the ARC Ensemble with guests Baritone Peter Barrett and cellist Se-Doo Park.  The main draw for me was Respighi’s Il tramonto; a setting for baritone and string quartet of an Italian translation of Shelley’s The Sunset.  This was indeed very well executed but was far from the most interesting part of the afternoon.

It was actually the final piece that was the revelation; Castelnuevo-Tedesco’s Piano Quintet No. 1.  It’s a really fun piece in high romantic style with tons of melodic ideas and lots of colour.  It was given a truly virtuoso performance by Erika Raum, Benjamin Bowman, Steven Dann, Se-Doo Park and Dianne Werner.  I think I’ll be looking for more examples of Castelnuevo-Terdesco’s work.