Mirror, Mirror

Mirror, Mirror is a fifteen minute film from Essential Opera based on a score and libretto by Anna Pidgorna.  There’s a lot to unpack for a fifteen minute work!  First off, let’s be clear that this is a film and not a video of a performance or production that might have had a live audience.  It’s shot on location in Nova Scotia; on the beach, in the forest etc.  And it’s done very well with excellent editing and high quality in the audio and video recording.

mm1

Continue reading

News roundup

mirrormirrorTonight Essential Opera have a short livestream of a new creation.  It’s a fifteen minute piece on the theme of Snow White called Mirror, Mirror.  Words and music are by Anna Pidgorna.  It’s being screened on Youtube and Facebook at 7pm EST.

Tapestry Opera is offering a full-time, paid, multi-year professional opportunity to female-identifying and non-binary music directors and conductors in partnership with Pacific Opera Victoria and leading orchestral partner the Toronto Symphony Orchestra, collaborating with over 10 other Canadian opera companies and orchestras for national placements.  All the details on the programme and the application process are here.

The Royal Conservatory of Music have announced a metric shedload of cancellations, alterations and postponements relative to their 2020/21 season.  All the details are here.  In any event, if you were planning on seeing anything live or via webstream from the RCM I’d double check!

Suzie Leblanc has a new website.  You can check it out here.

Bring me the head of Carla Huhtanen

Carla Huhtanen and Joseph Macerollo_La Testa dAdrianeA concert of contemporary works for accordion?  Why not!  Well it was more of a concert of contemporary works for fixed reed instruments with, ironically, Trinity St. Paul’s most impressive fixed reed instrument forming an unused but imposing backdrop to the proceedings.  Things started off conventionally enough with Soundstreams’ Artistic Director Lawrence Cherney on stage with three players of different instruments describing their histories and properties and then mild Hell broke loose as a curiously clad Joseph Macerollo burst into the auditorium, ejected Lawrence and friends and launched into R. Murray Schafer’s performance piece La Testa d’Adriane; the tale of a head mystically preserved between life and death.  At this point the purpose of the rather bizarre contraption on stage was unclear but soon enough the cloth was pulled back to reveal Carla Huhtanen, or her head at least.  More accordion and speech from Macerollo and a bizarre collection of grunts, squeaks, shrieks and gurning from Carla followed.  Madness or genius?  It’s Schafer.  The question is unanswerable.

Continue reading