Trying on The Overcoat

New comic operas are rare.  New comic operas that are actually funny are vanishingly rare.  The Overcoat: A Musical Tailoring is such a beast.  It’s a new piece with music by James Rolfe and a libretto by Morris Panych derived from his twenty year old stage adaptation of Gogol’s short story.  Originally commissioned by Tapestry Opera, the Toronto staging was under the joint auspices of that company and Canadian Stage with the work also to be staged by co-producer Vancouver Opera as part of their summer festival.

DressRehearsal_Overcoat-DahliaKatz-5427_preview

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Whose wearing the Overcoat?

Casting has now been announced for The Overcoat: A Musical Tailoring; an opera by Morris Panych and James Rolfe based on Gogol’s short story by way of Panych’s 1990s theatrical version.  The opera is a co-production of Vancouver Opera, Tapestry Opera and Canadian Stage and will premiere in Toronto’s Bluma Appel Theatre (March 29th to April 14th) before heading to the Vancouver Playhouse (April 28th to May 12th).

Geoffrey Sirett as Akakiy in The Overcoat A Musical Tailoring_Photo Credit Dahlia Katz_preview

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Selfie

selfieSelfie is a work in progress by Chris Thornborrow and Julie Tepperman.  It’s still incomplete and the performances over the last couple of days were workshops designed to elicit audience feedback.  It had its genesis at the 2013 LibLab and it’s come a long way.  The original sketch of two teenagers texting each other is turning into an hour long piece about cyberbullying.  It’s a rather disturbing exploration of how technology allows teenagers to do all those things which teenagers do with even less “supervision” than ever.  In this case a manipulative girl (Cindy played by Larissa Koniuk) tries to make up for her split from her rather feckless boyfriend (Devon played by Asitha Tennekoon) by engineering a split between her friend Mindy (Meher Pavri) and her bloke Tyler (Giovanni Spanu).  The result is a massive on-line slut shaming campaign against the fifth character Heather who has no real identity or agency until the very last scene.  Adults encountered along the way are portrayed as clueless, ineffective or bureaucratically indifferent.

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